ABOUT OUR COVER CARS
HANDBOOK 416: 1963 Corvette Sting Ray
The 1963 Corvette represented a milestone for the marque. It was a fresh redesign year and signaled the introduction of the Sting Ray name, and the now iconic split rear window treatment. Read More+

The 1963 Corvette represented a milestone for the marque. It was a fresh redesign year and signaled the introduction of the Sting Ray name, and the now iconic split rear window treatment. Model year 1963 was the first year of the C2 generation that lasted to 1967.

The C2 was the first American car with hidden headlights since the 1942 DeSoto, a trait that would continue in the Vette until 2005 and the C5. Another innovative element was the design of the doors, which extended into the roof of the car. The split-window treatment had a one-year run because of complaints about poor rearward visibility... sometimes that's how rarity is created.

Standard power was provided by a 327-cubic-inch V8 rated at 250 horsepower. Up-model 300- and 340-horse 327s were also offered. With GM's Ramjet Fuel Injection, the 327 was coaxed to pump out 360 horsepower. The injection upgrade cost $430, which smells like a deal to us, since today "fuelies" are at the top of the Vette collector car food chain.

Our cover model is a Sebring Silver, factory four-speed model powered by a 340-horse version of GM's 327-inch small-block V8. This car has 57,000 original miles on the clock, has received the NCRS Top Flight Award four times, and was a winner of a prestigious Bloomington Gold Certificate in 2014.

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HANDBOOK 415: 1986 Ferrari 328 GTB
Produced between 1985 and 1989, the Ferrari 328 was available as a Gran Turismo Berlinetta (GTB), a solid-top coupe, and as a Gran Turismo Spider (GTS), and open-air targa top variant. Read More+

Produced between 1985 and 1989, the Ferrari 328 was available as a Gran Turismo Berlinetta (GTB), a solid-top coupe, and as a Gran Turismo Spider (GTS), and open-air targa top variant. The 328 series was preceded by the 308, which many will recognize as the Ferrari made famous on the Magnum PI television show. Ferrari produced 6,068 328s during its production run with 4,724 being GTS models and only 1,344 being GTBs like this one.

Our cover car is an '86 model with a five-speed manual transmission, Rosso Corsa Red paint, and an immaculate tan interior.

A mid-mounted 3.2-liter naturally aspirated V8 provides the soundtrack. The engine features four valves per cylinder, Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, and 270 horsepower under the right foot. The 328 has a reputation as one of the more reliable Ferraris as most maintenance can be performed without dropping the engine from the chassis. It is also a great entry-level Ferrari for budding collectors. The 328 gave way to the 348, which represented further refinement of the automaker's mid-ship V8 platform.

We'd like to thank the owner for lending us his Prancing Horse so we could photograph it for our Handbook and share it with you.

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HANDBOOK 414: 1970 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray
How would you spend $5,519.10 in 1970? The owner of this Vette wisely invested exactly that amount into a 390-horse, 500 lbs-ft of torque 454-inch Turbo-Jet big-block convertible. Read More+

How would you spend $5,519.10 in 1970? The owner of this Vette wisely invested exactly that amount into a 390-horse, 500 lbs-ft of torque 454-inch Turbo-Jet big-block convertible. This LS5 version of the Rat motor used a 10.25:1 compression ratio, performance camshaft, and a Rochester 750 cfm four barrel carburetor to make its power. The top-of-the-line big-block was the LS7, which used higher 11.25:1 compression and a Holley 800 cfm four barrel carb to generate its 465 ponies, but while advertised in marketing brochures GM subsequently banned high-performance cars and none were sold as the Vette, like many iconic American musclecars, began to succumb to gas shortages and car insurance overages. The 454 big-blocks replaced the 427 as the top-dog engines and the LT1 small-block made its debut in the Corvette in the 1970 editions.

This paint code 974 Monza Red C3 example also sports a Muncie four-speed manual transmission, posi-traction rear end, and a special final drive gear ratio... they don't get much more desirable than this.

Model year 1970 was an odd one because a labor dispute extended the '69 production run and shortened manufacturing of the '70s. As a result, only 17,316 Vettes rolled off GM production lines for 1970, versus 38,762 in '69. Only 6,648 of the '70s were drop tops. Some of the 1970 updates included replacing replaced the four side gills with egg-crate vents on the side, slightly flaring the fenders to keep pebbles from being kicked up and scratching the paint, and Tuxedo Black was dropped from the 1970 palette.

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HANDBOOK 413: 1988 BMW M3
In 1985 the E30 M3 was born when BMW tapped its M Power division to drop a hot four cylinder in the 3-series. The result was transcendental as it put the lightweight chassis/high-revving engine equation to the test. Read More+

In 1985 the E30 M3 was born when BMW tapped its M Power division to drop a hot four cylinder in the 3-series. The result was transcendental as it put the lightweight chassis/high-revving engine equation to the test. The E30 M3 has a dozen body panel or exterior trim differences compared to a conventional 3-series, the most notable being its bulging fender flares. It also had upgraded brakes and more serious suspension. A 2.3-liter S14B23 engine rated at 195 horsepower provides the thrills in U.S. spec models. This '88 model has 42,000 on the odometer but looking at the cleanliness of the engine you'd swear it was 4,200. In 1988, the M3 received an updated version of the S14, the S14B23 EzVO2 which featured a more aggressive cam, a bump in compression, reworked port design in the cylinder head, larger diameter exhaust tubes, and a bump to 212 horsepower.

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HANDBOOK 412: 1974 LANCIA STRATOS HF
The Lancia Stratos HF was the first car purposely built for competition in the World Rally Championship, and its bold, radical design looked like nothing else on the road, ever. Read More+

The Lancia Stratos HF was the first car purposely built for competition in the World Rally Championship, and its bold, radical design looked like nothing else on the road, ever. Further adding to the avant-garde car’s allure was the fact that it was probably the only Ferrari-powered car to be regularly seen covered in mud and sliding around the world’s toughest rally stages. Powered by a 192 bhp, 2,418 cc Ferrari Dino V6 backed by a five-speed manual the Stratos is a terror. The Italian also features four-wheel independent suspension with front coil springs and rear MacPherson struts, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. This example is one of about 400 made. It has all its original running gear and 62k on the clock.

The Startos has quite the backstory. It all started in 1970, Italian design house Bertone arrived at the Turin Motor Show with a radical concept, the Stratos Zero. It was described as "a spaceship for the road" and struck a chord with the automotive press and the public as well as Lancia Director of Public Relations Sandro Fiorio. Fiorio turned to his son, Cesare, Lancia’s rally team chief, and the two pondered about how a production version of the Stratos could be introduced in order to reverse the fortunes of Lancia's struggling motorsports division. After getting 500 246 Dino from Ferrari and developing the combination, the Stratos went to battle in full force in 1973. The car won the Firestone Rally in April, finished second in the illustrious Targa Florio, and then won its first big-time race, the Tour de France Auto. In 1974 the Stratos was produced as a road going version for homologation into the FIA Group 4 division and this car is one of those FIA qualifiers.

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HANDBOOK 411: 1966 Chevelle Convertible
The 1966 model year was a big one for the Chevelle as it got a punch up in the styling department and some added juice under the hood. In fact, the Chevelle was completely restyled in '66. Read More+

The 1966 model year was a big one for the Chevelle as it got a punch up in the styling department and some added juice under the hood. In fact, the Chevelle was completely restyled in '66. It featured smoother contours compared to the boxier previous iteration and a broad new grille and bumper treatment. The SS 396 Super Sport graduated from a box on the option sheet to a full-fledged, stand-alone model. Going SS 396 didn't totally answer the engine question as GM offered three versions of its 396-cubic-inch TurboJet big-block V8 in the car. The standard engine was rated at 325 horsepower and there were 360- and 375-horse versions also available.

This particular Chevelle, a highly coveted convertible, sports a displacement boosting engine swap. The stock 396 V8 and automatic transmission were replaced with a big block 502 crate motor and 4-speed manual transmission. The stock bench front seat was also replaced with twin bucket seats along with a new center console.

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HANDBOOK 410: 1913 Daimler Type-20 Touring Car
This 1913 Daimler Type-20 Touring Car epitomized the grandeur of the automobile's early years. These cars were top echelon machines aimed at wealthy owners and their quality always shows through. Read More+

This 1913 Daimler Type-20 Touring Car epitomized the grandeur of the automobile's early years. These cars were top echelon machines aimed at wealthy owners and their quality always shows through. The engine is a 20-horse 3,309cc four cylinder sleeve valve engine known as the Daimler-Knight. This design features machined sleeves that are positioned between the piston and the cylinder wall in the cylinder. The sleeve rotates and ports in the side of the sleeve come into alignment with the cylinder's inlet and exhaust ports at the appropriate stages in the engine's combustion cycle. Designed by American Charles Knight, these engines were produced in limited numbers from around 1906 to 1940.

The idea behind Knight's creations was not power or efficiency but noise reduction. In 1906 poppet valve engines were annoyingly loud. The camshafts of the day were crude and there wasn't much experimentation with profiles going on. In many instances the cams and valvetrain components were located on the outside of the engine.

Knight wanted to license an engine maker in each industrialized country to produce a Knight-style valve system for its own home market. Some of the early takers were Daimler Motor Co. of Coventry, England, Levassor in France, Mercedes in Germany, Minerva Company in Belgium, Panhard, and Willys-Overland in America. Willys was the most prolific. The company had developed both a four- and six-cylinder sleeve-valve engines.

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HANDBOOK 409: 2013 & 2014 McLaren MP4-12C Spiders
The MP4-12C is the first production car engineered and produced solely by McLaren since the F1. The Creamsicle-colored duo are the roadster versions introduced in 2012. Read More+

The MP4-12C is the first production car engineered and produced solely by McLaren since the F1. The Creamsicle-colored duo are the roadster versions introduced in 2012. They have all the sexy supercar attributes one would expect; carbon fiber composite Monocell chassis, mid-mounted 625-horsepower twin-turbo V8, Formula 1-derived dual clutch gearbox and a brake force vectoring system that was so effective it was banned from Formula 1. This setup increases braking power to the inside rear tire to better initiate cornering. The McLaren posts the number to back up its seductive silhouette; 204 mph top speed, 3.1-second 0-62 mph sprint.

The McLaren was design as a convertible from the very beginning, so the car required no strengthening to lose its top. However, the car does gain 88 pounds due to the folding hard top mechanism, which needs 17 seconds to hide this behind the passenger cell, an operation that can be performed at speeds of up to 19 mph. In addition to that, the carmaker introduced a power rear windscreen, which can be sent to bed or erected at the touch of a button. The carmaker also gifted the car with a glass engine cover and developed new wheels for the Spider.

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HANDBOOK 408: EMORY MOTORSPORTS OUTLAW 356
Want a Porsche 356 taken to the next level? An Emory Outlaw is a modified 356 that began life as a factory steel-bodied car in Germany. Read More+

Want a Porsche 356 taken to the next level? An Emory Outlaw is a modified 356 that began life as a factory steel-bodied car in Germany. These cars start with a bare-metal, rotisserie restoration with the goal of improved handling, styling and drivability, frequently far beyond the performance specifications of even Porsche’s competition cars from the era. The term '356 Outlaw' was a name given to The Emory's in the early 80’s because of their race and rally inspired look. These cars start with a bare-metal, rotisserie restoration with the goal of improved handling, styling, and drivability. Body changes can include smoothing bumpers, adding louvers, and other period accents. Billet alloy wheels in a few styles and many finishes combined with performance tires round out the appearance package. Emory Motorsports also addresses performance. Owners can choose from a variety of engines, 911 rear suspension, modern disc brakes, or 911 4- or 5-speed transmissions. The fully reborn Emory 356 Outlaw is a lightweight, nimble machine that is a joy to drive.

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HANDBOOK 407: 1975 NIKI LAUDA FERRARI 312T
Don't worry we Photo-shopped the festive number and name change on the famous Niki Lauda Ferrari 312T. This rolling slice of motorsports history is safe and sound. Read More+

Don't worry we Photo-shopped the festive number and name change on the famous Niki Lauda Ferrari 312T. This rolling slice of motorsports history is safe and sound.

The previous Ferrari 312, the 312B, had the power from the hearty V12 but couldn't manage to make the most of it. The key to the 312T's success is its transvers-mounted gearbox that moved weight between the axles and greatly enhanced handling. For the 1975 F1 campaign Ferrari built five chassis for competition; numbers 018, 021, 022, 023 and 024, which were easily spotted on-track by their towering air intake scoops. Our cover car, chassis #022, was instrumental in Lauda's charge to the '75 championship. After winning the non-championship scoring International Trophy race at Silverstone, Lauda raced #022 five times, nabbing a win, a runner-up, and a podium third as well as a points-scoring sixth and one DNF.

Fast Facts: 1975 Ferrari 312T, Chassis 022

  • Designed by Mauro Forghieri for the 1975 season
  • Chassis 022 was piloted by both Clay Regazzoni and Niki Lauda in 1975
  • DNF- South African GP, Kyalami (Regazzoni)
  • 1st- International Trophy, Silverstone (Lauda)
  • DNF- Spanish GP, Montjuich Park (Lauda)
  • 5th- Belgian GP, Zolder (Regazzoni)
  • 2nd- Dutch GP, Zandvoort (Lauda)
  • 1st- French GP, Paul Ricard (Lauda)
  • 3rd- German GP, Nürburgring (Lauda)
  • 6th- Austrian GP, Österreichring (Lauda)
  • In all, Ferrari 312T cars went on to win 27 races, four Constructors’ Championships, and three Drivers’ Championships over their history

Fast Facts: Niki Lauda

  • Three-time Formula 1 Champion
  • Was among the early so-called “ride buyers,” meaning he actually took out personal loans to pay teams for the opportunity to drive
  • Break came in 1974 when a former teammate spoke favorably of Niki Lauda to Enzo Ferrari. Ferrari hired Lauda, paying him enough to clear his debts
  • Ferrari’s faith in Lauda was rewarded with a second place finish in his first race, and a win (Ferrari’s first in two seasons) just three races later
  • Lauda’s 1975 season started slowly (nothing better than fifth place in the first four races), but he gained momentum in the new Ferrari 312T car, winning four of the next five races
  • Also won the Drivers’ Championship in 1975
  • In the 1976 Formula 1 Season (backdrop for the movie, "Rush"), Lauda had a near-fatal crash at the German Grand Prix, suffering severe burns and later lapsing into a coma. He returned only six weeks (two races) later, setting up a legendary battle with McLaren driver James Hunt for the Drivers’ Championship
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HANDBOOK 406: 1965 DODGE CORONET 500
The car you see here, a 1965 Dodge Coronet coupe, is more than meets the eye. It started out as a 361 cubic inch V8 car that was bought to help replace the owner's first Coronet that he ordered new in 1964 with a stout 426 Wedge engine and four-speed stick. Read More+

The car you see here, a 1965 Dodge Coronet coupe, is more than meets the eye. It started out as a 361 cubic inch V8 car that was bought to help replace the owner's first Coronet that he ordered new in 1964 with a stout 426 Wedge engine and four-speed stick. The Wedge is the direct predecessor to the all-conquering Hemi engine. The original '64 Coronet got wrecked in 1988 and the owner dutifully dismantled it piece by piece using a Sawzall and a torch. He saved the 60k-mile Wedge drivetrain and spent 12 years re-motoring and restoring the '65 Dodge under a Costco canopy in the backyard. The famed Wedge was available in '62, '63, and '64 B-Body Mopars. Known as the Stage III, the V8 was available in two compression ratios in '64. An 11.0:1 produced 415 horsepower and a 12.5:1 ratio pumped out 425, although this is viewed as a conservative rating. By saving the Wedge powertrain the owner was able to reach back in time and relive his Hemi memories.

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HANDBOOK 405: 2008 PORSCHE 911 GT2
With 530 horsepower awaiting the hammer drop, the 2008 GT2 was the fastest and most powerful road-going 911 that Stuttgart had ever sold to the motoring public when it hit the streets. Read More+

With 530 horsepower awaiting the hammer drop, the 2008 GT2 was the fastest and most powerful road-going 911 that Stuttgart had ever sold to the motoring public when it hit the streets. The car sports a 3.6-liter 911 Turbo engine but in the GT2 the powerplant gets bigger turbos and a revised intake manifold for a 50-horsepower bump over mortal 911s. In fact, its 530 horsepower, 3.6-liter displacement translates into an impressive 147 horsepower per liter specific output. The GT2 weighs 320 pounds less than a Turbo and its 3.7-second 0-60 and 204 mph top speed were top of the 911 line in 2008. It was the first manual transmission Porsche with launch control and the GT2 was so quick off the line the tach needle reportedly could not keep pace and a shift light was dropped in the gauge cluster to ensure timely gear changes. The GT2's racing pedigree can also be seen it its carbon ceramic drake discs, adjustable suspension, and easy to change rear gear ratios. The Porsche 911 GT2 is a true wolf in sheep's clothing, race car for the street proposition.

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HANDBOOK 403: 1948 CHEVY FLEETLINE
The body lines of this era of Fleetline is familiar because of its long model run. It was produced from 1941 to 1952 due to WWII when automakers were too busy supporting the war effort to revamp the design their passenger cars. Read More+

The body lines of this era of Fleetline is familiar because of its long model run. It was produced from 1941 to 1952 due to WWII when automakers were too busy supporting the war effort to revamp the design their passenger cars. The car was powered by a 216 cid I6 rated at 90 horsepower and offered in two configurations, an Aerosedan two door version and a Sportmaster four-door.

Jim B., the owner of this outstanding example, knows about commitment. He’s owned this fabulous Chevy Fleetline for 43 years. He bought the car when he was 16 years old in 1972. It was a gasser. And that’s how he drove it to high school. In 1983 he deemed the gasser’s handling too "darty" and installed a standard front end. As his family grew the Fleetline was stored in the garage on jackstands where it slumbered from 1985 to 2008. In 2008 the car was resurrected with Wicked Fabrication handling the mechanicals and Jon Beyer spraying the paint.

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HANDBOOK 402: 1968 Iso Grifo
The body lines of this era of Fleetline is familiar because of its long model run. It was produced from 1941 to 1952 due to WWII when automakers were too busy supporting the war effort to revamp the design their passenger cars. Read More+

Early Iso Grifo sports cars were powered by Chevrolet small-block V8 engines from the Corvette backed by Muncie four-speed gearboxes. Output was rated between 300 and 350 horsepower and the Grifo was capable of 165 mph. The chassis was designed by the Ferrari 250 GTO engineer Giotto Bizzarrini and the body was penned by celebrated designer Guirgetto Guigairo who was working at Bertone at the time. The Grifo debuted in 1965.

During the production run Renzo Rivolta passed away and his son Piero was now running the company. Piero wanted something a little special so he decided to upgrade the look of the Grifo by adding an elongated nose with hidden headlights. But he still wanted something next level for his best customers. The Grifo Targa was just the answer. The overall height was a mere 48 inches; the front had aggressive quad-headlights, and the fenders were filled with lightweight alloy wheels backed by disc brakes all around. It was a very sophisticated and lightweight car that had a base price twice the amount of a Corvette.

Iso only built four long-nosed Targas and our cover car, a 1968 model chassis #337, is one of those rare long-nose Targa gems.

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HANDBOOK 399: 1960 Fiat Jolly
Based on the Fiat 500, 600, and Multipla platforms the Jolly is a specialty vehicle converted by Ghia. Jollys were built from 1958 to 1966 during a renaissance for the rich and pampered as yacht tenders to run in-port errands, runabouts on the estate, or just tooling about the beachfront. Read More+

Based on the Fiat 500, 600, and Multipla platforms the Jolly is a specialty vehicle converted by Ghia. Jollys were built from 1958 to 1966 during a renaissance for the rich and pampered as yacht tenders to run in-port errands, runabouts on the estate, or just tooling about the beachfront. Jollys based on the Fiat 500 were air cooled while the "big block" 600 featured a water cooled four cylinder engine. Top speed was quoted as 59 mph but no reference to how level the test track was could be found.

Fiat Jollys were available in pink, coral, white, pale yellow and sky blue. The design firm Ghia handled the transformation that took an everyday city car and made it an exclusive status symbol. The rich and famous responded. A notable owner of the money side of the equation was Aristotle Onassis while actor Yul Brynner represented the celeb owners.

Most Jollys are low-mileage propositions which makes the 7,393 miles on our coral-colored Fiat 600-based 1960 example right around average. The Jolly was sold in America from 1958 to 1961 in very limited numbers. The conversion included cut-down sides and windshield, a striped and fringed surrey top, and chromed body-pipework. Once frowned upon the value of these runabouts has climbed steadily.

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HANDBOOK 398: 1955 Chevy Suburban
Subtle can be awesome. Want proof? Look no further than Jon Byers' seductive 1955 Chevy Suburban. Some of the most eye-catching rides don't have flames, loud graphics, or bulging fenders. Read More+

Subtle can be awesome. Want proof? Look no further than Jon Byers' seductive 1955 Chevy Suburban. Some of the most eye-catching rides don't have flames, loud graphics, or bulging fenders. Jon, chief proprietor of Byers Custom & Restoration in Auburn, Washington, used simple mods that have a "greater than the sum of its parts" effect on the vehicle's overall look. Don't be fooled into thinking that the subtlety of the mods mean they require any less skill to pull off. The work on this old-time family hauler is top notch.

The Chevy sports a mildly chopped top, but any chop is a titanic undertaking. This one features a three-inch trim on the pillars and a two-inch roof reduction. Jon said he took this tack to attain the proper proportion the roof, the window openings, and the side of the truck. The hood was also 1.5-inch pie cut to bring it down and further dial-in the truck's proportional balance. Jon also modified the headlight eyebrows and elected to swap the taillights with larger, more elaborate units from a Chevy Cameo pickup. These visual tweaks, the hunkered stance, and big, heavily tucked wheels with cavernous lips all conspire to make the Bow Tie a standout.

The 'Burban's foundation is an Art Morrison Enterprises Profiler Air Spring Plus perimeter frame welded together by Wicked Fabrication of Auburn. The frame, which is set up for an air suspension, was kicked to accommodate a Ford 9-inch and fitted with Firestone airbags. The bags operate between 50 and 90 psi and when deflated provide around four inches of drop. Wicked capped the frame rails, turning the encapsulated space into an air tank. The system also uses a pair of five-gallon tanks.

Inside, a reshaped and reimagined dash houses modern gauges and sports a custom wood grain effect paint job complete with dovetail joints in the appropriate places. An ididit steering column and LeCarra Classics tiller keep the big truck on the road. The ceiling is adorned with a simulated surfboard that houses 3,000 watts worth of Phoenix Gold amps.

Pop the hood open and you're greeted by a 468-inch Chevy V8 set off by a shaved firewall and custom inner fenders. The big-block's visual impact is maximized by flamed valve covers and a huge air cleaner that nestles nicely in the firewall cutout. A Quadrajet carb feeds the beast and Jon pegs power output at 450 horses.

The Chevy spent quite some time in an orange guide coat, appearing at a few shows in this guise. The big truck was eventually finished off with a healthy dose of Salsa Red. There is an Eric Brockmeyer illustration of the 'Burban floating around. In it the truck is presented with flames down its side. Kudos to Jon for staying with a solid color... the flames would have overcooked the truck's aura.

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HANDBOOK 397: 1960 Edsel Ranger
Daring to be different isn’t much of a challenge for Bud W. The fringe does not scare him… he's quite at home in this mindset and his tricked out 1960 Edsel is rolling proof. Read More+

Daring to be different isn’t much of a challenge for Bud W. The fringe does not scare him… he's quite at home in this mindset and his tricked out 1960 Edsel is rolling proof.

Edsels, by their nature, fly well under the radar. The 1960 Edsel is rare. According to Hemmings Motor News and Hagerty Price Guide only 2,846 examples rolled off the assembly line. But Bud's car is impressive because of the depth and quality of the work that's gone into it, not how few were made. One would quickly peg the Edsel as a super rare one-of-76 convertible… one would be wrong. Bud's Edsel started life as one of 777 two-door sedans and had, according to NADAguides.com, a base price of $2,643 in 1960. Bud decided to go big and make the sedan a one-off roadster… and boy was he in for a ride.

Mike Walter of Rainier Rod & Custom in Graham, Washington, handled the transformation. It was much more than a measure twice, cut once endeavor. The conversion necessitated a 15-degree layback of the windshield, shortening of the package tray, reworking the windows using the originals and cut-down frames from a Starliner, making a tonneau for the rear, and fitting a Thunderbird interior. A lot of fine detail work also went into the fender skirts, which were extended and flush mounted. The taillight surrounds are one-offs machined from billet aluminum then fitted with the original lenses.

The Edsel's frame and chassis were fortified with gussets, beefier convertible-spec body mounts, and buttressing to regain the stability lost when the top was removed. The car's hunkered stance comes complements of a RideTech bolt-on four-link air suspension featuring ShockWave shocks. Along with the suspension mods Walter raised the center tunnel to ensure driveshaft clearance when the Edsel scrapes pavement.

The engine bay was shaved street rodder style and fitted with custom-fabbed inner fenders, radiator plate, and firewall. A fully wire tucked Ford 429 is nestled neatly in the pristine engine room. The '70 vintage V8 was prepared by 410 Machine Services out of Buckley, Washington. A set of off-the-shelf Tri-Y headers from Ford Power Train Applications lead to custom 2.5-inch pipes and Flowmaster mufflers. Walter really earned his pay for the week by fabricating a custom intake that features a pair of cone-style filters. It's a sweet set-up.

When prowling the streets Bud enjoys the Edsel's decidedly minimalistic feel. The interior is a calm, Zen-like two-tone featuring the car's body color and a neutral tan. The dash is clean and features All American gauges from Classic Instruments finished in nickel, a stock-issue steering wheel, and we really like how the RideTech controls are housed in the original dash speaker. The speaker grille is spring loaded and pops up when pressed, revealing the inflation buttons and pressure dials. Another standout feature is the custom metal console that houses the C6 automatic's shift linkages and the RideTech air lines.

The big cruiser was painted an intoxicating blend of a Toyota Pistachio from the 2006 palette and a custom mix from Walter, who handled the spraying duties. Tacoma's Junior Nelson was tasked with the pinstriping.

This car was a big hit during its time at Griot's Garage. As we arranged its cover photo shoot the Edsel developed a receiving line of admirers. The more they looked at it, the more its smoothness and detail were appreciated. Speaking of appreciation, we'd like to thank Bud for sharing his pride and joy with us.

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HANDBOOK 396: 2015 Challenger SRT Hellcat
The Hellcat has set the performance world on fire. The car is 707 horsepower worth of insanity that Dodge had the audacity to deliver it with a full bumper-to-bumper warranty. Read More+

The Hellcat has set the performance world on fire. The car is 707 horsepower worth of insanity that Dodge had the audacity to deliver it with a full bumper-to-bumper warranty. The Hellcat is so stout it comes with two sets of keys so you can keep your underwear clean. There’s a black "low-key" that limits the Hemi to 500 horses and a red fob that unleashes the full potential of the blown V8. Chrysler wants you to know that its new supercharged 6.2-liter Hemi is up to the 707-horsepower challenge. "The breakthrough SRT engine features a forged-steel crankshaft with induction-hardened bearing surfaces. The result," says Chrysler, "is a crank so well-engineered it can withstand firing pressures of 1,595 psi… the equivalent of five family sedans standing on each piston, every two revolutions. And its unique, specially tuned crank damper has been tested to 13,000 rpm." Good to know next time we need to park five family sedans in a pinch.

Let’s talk more tech… "lHigh-strength, forged-alloy pistons, developed using advanced telemetry measurement, are coupled to powder-forged connecting rods with high load-capacity bushings and diamond-like carbon-coated piston pins," says the Chrysler PR/media machine.

At 2,380cc/rev the twin-screw blower has more displacement than a Honda Civic. The boost system features integral charge coolers and an integrated electronic bypass valve to regulate boost pressure to a maximum of 11.6 psi.

We love it when old racer tricks are embraced by automakers. Namely, how Dodge has dedicated the Challenger's inner headlamps to become air intakes that feed the supercharger. They call them Air Catcher inlet ports. The blower further benefits from a 92 mm throttle body, the largest ever used in a Chrysler Group vehicle.

The fuel system has a tall order keeping the big, blown V8 properly quenched. It features an in-tank pump that accommodates variable pressures, half-inch fuel lines, and eight injectors each capable of delivering a flow rate of 600cc/min. The system flows enough to drain the fuel tank in approximately 13 minutes at full power.

What about handling? The suspension is fortified to handle the power and the Hellcat features Brembo brakes all around with the big front stoppers relying on 15.4-inch, two-piece rotors and six-piston calipers. The Dodge rides on 20x9.5 SRT-exclusive Slingshot split seven-spoke, forged-aluminum wheels. On Hellcats the rollers can be ordered with a standard Matte Black finish or the optional "Brass Monkey" dark bronze finish. Our cover car rolls matte wheels, is painted Sublime Metallic, one of the cool throwback colors on the Hellcat palette, and sports a six-speed manual transmission.

We’d like to thank the owner for letting us spend some quality time with the car while shooting it for the cover... next time please leave us the red keys.

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HANDBOOK 395: 1966 MORGAN
The owner bought this seductive 1966 Morgan on Christmas Day 2001 and used it for daily transportation for the next 10 years. He took an upgrade instead of replace philosophy as parts were needed and the result is a really fast car. Read More+

The owner bought this seductive 1966 Morgan on Christmas Day 2001 and used it for daily transportation for the next 10 years. He took an upgrade instead of replace philosophy as parts were needed and the result is a really fast car.

"It began with replacing the generator/regulator with an alternator and went from there. Then the transmission, originally a Ford four-speed, was replaced with a Ford Type 9 five-speed with a close ratio Quaife gearset blueprinted installed in a Quaife aluminum case. The rear axle was replaced with an MGB axle with a 4.875 gear set and Quaife limited slip differential to mate with the transmission 2.39 first gear. The slightly wider MG axle necessitated lacing the upgraded wire wheels on the rear inward half an inch. The rear axle has a panhard rod and torque reaction rods added."

"Then the engine was upgraded from a Ford Kent 1500cc Cortina GT (73 hp) to a Ford Kent-based 2100cc Cosworth BDG. A much more serious engine. This has an aluminum block, four valves per cylinder, is dry sumped, and is set up as a de-tuned Formula Atlantic engine with two 48mm Weber DCO/SP carburetors. The front brakes were upgraded and Alfin aluminum drums replaced the iron drums on the rear brakes. The suspension is stock with Koni shocks all around and steering bearings have been added to the front suspension. The chassis has been modified with an additional cross member located at the engine mounts and cross frame loops have been added to the scuttle (behind the dash) to add to the chassis rigidity and to the rear section for mounting the rear shocks. The stock 10 gallon fuel tank has been replaced with a custom 15 gallon aluminum tank. The original stock car is listed with a top speed of 95 mph and I've seen 125. As geared it will hit 60 mph at 9,500 rpm in first gear."

We're tempted to refute the owner so he'll take us for a fact-checking blast around the block... but we'll forgo that and simply thank him for the opportunity to feature this wild ride in our handbook.

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HANDBOOK 394: 2013 CORVETTE GRAND SPORT
The Corvette is the tip of GM’s technological spear. It the brand’s top dog of performance and the ‘Vette has seen its fair share of peaks and valleys over the years. Read More+

The Corvette is the tip of GM’s technological spear. It the brand’s top dog of performance and the ‘Vette has seen its fair share of peaks and valleys over the years. The fuelie cars of the ‘60s being a peak and any version from the early ‘80s representing a valley. But today the mighty Bow Tie is on the upswing. The new C7 is all the rage and it has the success of the C6 to thank for setting the stage.

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